AV Archiving Graduate Education Opportunities

AV Programs--Courses Offered (inc. Course Descriptions and Syllabi, where available)


Institution
Degree Program (and Specialization, where relevant)
URL
Lead Faculty /Instructors
Course Titles and Descriptions
Syllabus (when available)
Dates
UCLA
Moving Image Archive Studies MA
http://mias.gseis.ucla.edu/
See below.
MIAS 200: Moving Image Archiving: History, Philosopy, and Practice

Introduction to historical development of moving image archives. Critical analysis of archival policies regarding collection development, access, exhibition, cataloging, preservation, and restoration. Introduction to principle models and methodologies of moving image archive practices from 1938 establishment of International Federation of Film Archives to the present, addressing practices such as collection development of classical, national, regional, and non-mainstream materials (small gauge formats, independent and amateur productions, new media); changing role of technology in preservation and restoration; ethics of moving image restoration; cataloging standards and documentation systems; classical and alternative models of archive administration and funding; cultural impact of public programming; research and publication supported by moving image archives; access, education, and archival productions.

MIAS 210: Moving Image Preservation and Restoration

Moving Image Preservation and Restoration (4 units). Seminar, four hours. Critical analysis of distinct models for archival preservation and restoration of moving image media. Examination and evaluation of current preservation standards for storage and duplication. Discussion of critical preservation problems such as nitrate deterioration, color fading, vinegar syndrome, and irreplaceable formats. Exploration of case studies of specific restoration projects through critical before and after studies, with focus on crucial ethical issues embedded within each technical and aesthetic decision facing restorers. Of special interest is question of whether it is possible and appropriate to speak of particular schools and/or philosophies of restoration. Range of key issues addressed, such as identification of original versus subsequent and multiple versions and theoretical and practical distinctions between different types of restoration.

MIAS 220: Archaeology of Media

Seminar, four hours. History of moving image technologies. Examination of relationship between technological evolution and forms of moving image expression. Lectures combined with extensive presentations of full range of analog, video, and digital image types to train students to develop discerning eye required for professionals working in 21st-century moving image archive. In addition to study of specific technical developments such as new gauges, formats, color processes, aspect ratios, films stocks, and projection systems, exploration of larger economic and industrial forces behind them. Study of aesthetic consequences of specific production and exhibition innovations by examining different types of images, genres, and narratives that accompany and influence passage of new technologies.

MIAS 230: Moving Image Cataloging
Introduction to methodologies and standards specific to moving image cataloging. Discussion and debate of continued application of Library of Congress subject headings and genres to cataloged moving image materials. Exposure to variety of indexing languages used today within online environments and practical training in application of cataloging principles to motion pictures and television programs. Survey of general theories and alternate documentation practices at work within field as well as specific cataloging rules established by FIAF for local and national moving image archives. Discussion of important issues of public access, exploring various methods and protocols for making collection-related information available through secondary and nonsystematic channels such as study guides, collection profiles, Websites, stand-alone databases, and exhibition catalogs.

MIAS 240: Moving Images and Archival Administration

The day-to-day administration of moving image archive involves complex set of interrelated activities, including donor relations, deposit agreements, and application of copyright law; collection identification and cataloging; storage, conservation and preservation of moving image materials; budget planning, fundraising, and grant writing; staff training and supervision; programming, education initiatives, and internet access. The seminar will analyze the interrelationship between administrative policies, budgets, human resources, and overall archival goals. Through discussions with working archival professionals, these essential tasks will be explored, paying particular attention to the rapidly changing paradigms brought about by the migration of media into the digital realm.

MIAS 250: Access to Moving Image Collections

Survey and analysis of policies and procedures used to provide access to moving image collections. Identification and exploration, through lecture and discussion, of three distinct modes of public access: traditional access, public exhibition, and proactive access.
See http://mias.gseis.ucla.edu/current-students/courses/mias-courses/
2002-2015
UCLA
Master's in Library and Information Science with Specialization in Media Archival Studies (MLIS/MAS)
http://is.gseis.ucla.edu/programs/graduate-degree-programs/mlis-specializations/
Dept. Chair: Jonathan Furner
Program Manager: Snowden Becker
INF STD M486: Audiovisual Archiving in the 21st Century
Designed for Ethnomusicology majors. Examination of history, present state, and future of audiovisual archives, with specific focus on ethics, copyright, contracts, fieldwork, preservation, and access and issues related to technology, space, budgets, and staffing.

2015-
University at Albany, State University of New York
Master of Science in Information Science
http://www.albany.edu/informationstudies/ist_courses.php
Dept. Chair: Philip B. Eppard
IST 610: Visual Resource Management - Addresses the knowledge and competencies required by the visual resources profession. This course is concerned with the managment of visual resources, such as images, photographs, moving images, cultural objects and the like. Provides the necessary background to work in art libraries, museums, special collections, and institutions where information professionals are responsible to oversee and manage image/visual resources collections. Students will have an opportunity to work on practical problems and projects.

IST 654: Preservation Management in Archives and Libraries - An introductory survey of preservation management in libraries and archives, covering such topics as the historical evolution of the preservation dilemma, programs for academic and public libraries, collections maintenance and environmental controls, commercial binding and rebinding, selection for preservation and microfilming, security, archival preservation, paper conservation, disaster planning and recovery, and preservation of non-print materials (including electronic media).

2015-
New York University, Tisch School of the Arts
Master of Arts in Moving Image and Archive Preservation
http://www.nyu.edu/tisch/preservation/
Dan Streible, Director; Howard Besser, Associate Director
Introduction to Moving Image Archiving and Preservation
Film History/Historiography
Moving Image and Sound: Basic Issues and Training
Television: History and Culture
Access to Moving Image Collections
Copyright, Legal Issues, and Policy
Conservation and Preservation —Principles
Collection Management
Culture of Museums, Archives, and Libraries
Handling Complex Media
Curating Movings
Film Preservation
Video Preservation 1
Video Preservation 2
Digital Preservation
http://www.nyu.edu/tisch/preservation/curriculum.html
2015-
University of British Columbia
Master of Archival Studies (MAS)
http://slais.ubc.ca/programs/degrees/mas/
Luanne Freund, Acting Director
ARST 550: Management of Audio-Visual and Non-Textual Archives - Through this elective course students will be introduced to the theoretical and methodological knowledge necessary for the management of audiovisual and non-textual archives.
http://slais.ubc.ca/arst550/
2015
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Master's of Library and Information Science with Specialization in Special Collections
https://www.lis.illinois.edu/academics/degrees/specializations/certificate1

LIS590AV: Audiovisual Materials in Libraries and Archives - As analog film, video, and audio materials and playback equipment become obsolete, libraries and archives with audiovisual (AV) materials in their collections face great challenges in preserving these materials. AV preservation and collection is costly, time-consuming, and requires specialized knowledge. This course will discuss the ways that librarians and archivists are responding to the challenges of audiovisual handling, preservation and collection. [Elective course for Graduate Certificate in Special Collections] [First offered Summer 2009]

2009-
Long Island University
M. S. in Library and Information Science With Specialization in Archives and Records Management
http://www.liu.edu/palmer
Director, Gregory Hunter
LIS 611: Film and Media Collections - This course will provide an introduction to building and maintaining collections and services related to visual media, primarily moving image, sound and ephemera. Discussions will survey key components such as the history of film and media in library collections, collection development, access, equipment, copyright, emerging technologies and management of non-print formats

LIS 716: Audio Preservation - The purpose of the course is to explore the issues related to the preservation of audio materials, both in legacy formats and in current of future or digital forms. Students will be able to identify audio formats found in a library or archive. They will be knowledgeable about the fragility and obsolescence issues pertaining to preservation and access of audio formats.
http://palmerblog.liu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/611-Film-and-Media-Collections-Chen-Fall-20151.pdf
2015-
McGill University
Master of information Studies with Certificate in Digital Archives Management
http://www.mcgill.ca/sis/programs/mist
Kimiz Dalkir, Graduate Program Director
GLIS 633: Multimedia Systems - Theoretical and applied principles of multimedia systems design. Includes knowledge representation; interfaces; storage and retrieval of text, sound, still images, animation and video sequences; authoring software; hardware options; CD-ROM/DVD and web based systems; virtual reality; testing and evaluation. Students design and develop a small-scale system.
https://www.mcgill.ca/sis/files/sis/glis633_2015winter_frissen_web_rev.pdf
2015-
University of Pittsburgh
Master of Library and Information Science
http://www.ischool.pitt.edu/lis/
Sheila Corrall, Chair
LIS 2226: Moving Image Archives - Introduces various contexts moving image media occupies in collecting institutions as well as basic procedures to preserve these works. Motion picture film will be of primary focus, but other moving image media types will also be explored. Archival functions will be approached using cross-disciplinary frameworks as a way to interrogate the histories, technologies, preservation processes and accessibility of moving image media.

2015-
Pratt Institute
Master of Library and Information Science with Certificate in Archives
https://www.pratt.edu/academics/information-and-library-sciences/concentrations/archives-advanced-certificate/
Tula Giannini, Dean of School of Library and Information Science
LIS 668: Projects in Moving Image and Sound Archiving - FROM FILM, VIDEO, TO BORN DIGITAL, MOVING IMAGE AND SOUND RECORDINGS HAVE COMPELLED USERS SINCE THEIR ADVENT IN THE LATE 19TH CENTURY. TODAY, MANY ARCHIVES HOUSED AT UNIVERSITIES OR NON PROFIT INSTITUTIONS ACT TO PRESERVE THE MOVING IMAGE RECORD. HOWEVER, THE FRAGILITY OF THIS MEDIUM (PARTICULARLY THE MAGNETIC MEDIUM THAT HOLD SOUND AND VIDEO), COMBINED WITH THE PRESERVATION NEEDS OF TODAY'S BORN DIGITAL WORKS (SUCH AS INDEPENDENT DOCUMENTARIES), ARE QUESTIONING OUR COLLECTIVE ABILITY TO PRESERVE THIS WORK. THIS CLASS WILL WORK TO COMBAT THIS .TREND BY FOCUSING ON THE THEORETICAL AND PRACTICAL ASPECTS RELATED TO ARCHIVING MOVING IMAGE AND SOUND RECORDING, WITH A PARTICULAR FOCUS ON DIGITIZATION AND BORN-DIGITAL ASSETS.

LIS 694: Film and Media Collections - The course will provide an introduction to building and maintaining collections and services related to visual media, primarily moving images, sound and ephemera. Discussions will survey key components such as the history of film and media in library collections, collection development, access, equipment, copyright, emerging technologies and management of non-print formats.
http://www.thinkingprojects.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/lis668_fall2015_projects_moving_image.pdf
2015-
Simmons College
Master in Library and Information Science with Concentration in Archives Management
http://www.simmons.edu/academics/graduate-programs/library-and-information-science-archives-management-ms
Michele Cloonan, Dean
LIS 444: Archiving and Preserving Digital Media - The preservation and retention of media in digital environments are increasingly urgent issues for archival digital repositories. This course focuses on archiving and preserving a wide variety of digital media (primarily text, image, sound, moving images, and web sites), as well as thinking in a long-term way about overcoming the many challenges. Topics under discussion will include the characteristics of digital media that make a difference in their long-term preservation, media formats, rights issues, digital asset management, each addressed theoretically, historically, and practically.

2015-
University of Texas at Austin
Master of Science in Information Studies
https://www.ischool.utexas.edu/programs/masters
Andrew Dillon, Dean
INF 392L: Introduction to Audio Preservation and Formatting - The preservation and retention of media in digital environments are increasingly urgent issues for archival digital repositories. This course focuses on archiving and preserving a wide variety of digital media (primarily text, image, sound, moving images, and web sites), as well as thinking in a long-term way about overcoming the many challenges. Topics under discussion will include the characteristics of digital media that make a difference in their long-term preservation, media formats, rights issues, digital asset management, each addressed theoretically, historically, and practically.

INF 392M: Advanced Audio Preservation and Formatting - Exploration of changing concepts in the nature of audio information in different formats, issues of access within the context of preservation, criteria for prioritization of materials to be reformatted, considerations in invasive versus minimal restoration, and study of rare formats.
https://www.ischool.utexas.edu/courses/class_details?ClassID=3900
https://audiopreservation.wordpress.com

https://audiopreservation.wordpress.com/2015/01/20/inf-392l-introduction-to-audio-preservation-and-reformatting-spring-2015/
2015-
University of Toronto
Master of Information with Concentration in Archives and Records Management
http://www.ischool.utoronto.ca/mi
Seamus Ross, Dean
INF2311h: Managing AudioVisual Material - The purpose and content of this course is to provide an introduction to the world of audiovisual documents (photographs, sound recordings, moving images). This includes their history, physical makeup, stages of creation, appraisal, acquisition, arrangement and description and preservation. As well there will be a brief introduction to copyright as well as the licensing and distribution ramifications of using, exhibiting, and re-purposing AV documents. By focusing on the above knowledge set, the course will reveal how important they are in research terms both as an adjunct to other types of documents and in their own right. This exposure will make it evident that audiovisual documents deserve to be given the fullest consideration in archival and library management decision-making, as much as any other types of documents.

2015-
George Eastman House/University of Rochester -Selznick Graduate Program in Film and Media Preservation
Master of Arts in English
http://selznickschool.eastmanhouse.org/welcome.html
Jeff Stoiber, Assistant Curator (selznickschool@geh.org)
First year (Selznick certificate program)
Museum Practice
An intensive course designed to familiarize the student with the curatorial standards and practices for conserving moving image materials and related collections in a museum environment. Specific focus will be placed on museum and collection management issues in the areas of administration, acquisitions, research, cataloging, processing, as well as exhibition and preservation of film and moving image media formats.

Curatorial Theory and Practice
A survey course designed to acquaint the student with the history of the international motion picture archive movement. Major areas of investigation include: the origins of the theory and practice of motion picture archiving and preservation at the regional and national levels, collection acquisitions and management procedures, developing an institutional mission, in addition to the design and management of research, conservation, exhibition, and storage facilities.

Film Conservation and Restoration
A hands-on course designed to bring the student in direct contact with motion picture film formats and thereby develop an understanding of "movies" as legitimate museum artifacts. Instruction will be given in recognizing film formats, analyzing specific types of physical damage and deterioration, and developing strategies for their repair and conservation. Emphasis will be placed on learning the techniques and procedures for the preservation, restoration, and conservation of motion picture materials.

Moving Image Archive Management
The conservation of motion picture collections requires a complex set of professional knowledge and management skills. This course will introduce the student to the challenges involved in conserving and managing moving image collections, including issues related to acquisition, public access, intellectual property rights, proven strategies of conservation, as well as staff development and fund raising.

Laboratory Work
An introduction to the techniques, standards, and practices of motion picture laboratory conservation procedures. The course instruction will concentrate on the steps involved in preserving moving image formats, including: inspecting, repairing, and evaluating image characteristics, as well as an introduction to digital preservation technologies. Field trips to major film restoration facilities will be included.

Personal Project
Under the direction of the curators and staff of the George Eastman House Motion Picture Department, the student will select, plan, and undertake a significant project designed to challenge his/her abilities to function at the professional level in a motion picture museum or archive. Some relevant projects include: public programming and exhibitions, collection management, processing and conservation of motion picture related materials, in addition to acquisitions and cataloging.

Second year (MA in English from UofR)
Requirements—Two Semesters (30 credits):
  1. Film History (two required courses, chosen from following):
    • ENG 433: History of Silent Cinema, 1895-1927
    • ENG 434A: History of Sound Cinema, 1927-1959
    • ENG 434B: History of Sound Cinema, 1959-present
  2. Film Analysis, Film Historiography (one course drawn from one of the following):
    • CLT 414: New Japanese Directors; Women in Japanese Film; Japanese New Wave; Japanese Animation: Anime; History of Japanese Cinema; Nagisa Oshima: Rebel Films; Mobsters, Monsters, and Swords; Akira Kurosawa
    • FMS 435: German Directors; German Women Directors
    • FMS 437: Visions of Horror
    • FMS 438: New German Cinema
    • FMS 439: Avant-Garde Film
    • ENG 450: Film Analysis
    • ENG 451: Popular Film Genres: Film Noir; The Road Movie; The Science Fiction Film; The Gangster Film; The Detective Film; Blaxploitation and its Contexts; The Baseball Film; Vampire and Horror Movies
    • ENG 452: Studies in Film: Romantic Screwball Comedy; Race and Gender in Popular Films
    • ENG 453: Studies in a Director: Scorcese; Eastwood; Polanski; Hitchcock
    • ENG 454: Film History: Documenting Health; American Independent Cinema; Feminism and Film History; Films of the 1930's; Films of the 1960's; Films of the 1970's
    • ENG4 56: Studies in National Cinemas: Italian Cinema; British Cinema
    • French 481 / CLT 411: History of French Film
    • French 480 / CLT 480: French New Wave Cinema
    • French 483 / CLT 411: Contemporary French Film
    • ENG 471: History of African American Film.
  3. Bibliography / Filmography, Preservation, Museum Studies (one course from among the following):
    • ENG 454: Museum Studies
    • FMS 220: Film as Object
  4. Moving Image, Digital and Media Studies, Studio and Institutional Studies, Film Theory (one appropriate elective course drawn from approved offerings each year)
    • ENG 449: Text and Medium: Media A B C
    • ENG 457: Media Studies: Technology, Health, and Gender; Science Fiction, Science Documentary; Reproductive Technologies; Voice, Literature, and the Technology of Sound
    • ENG 557: Literary Studies for the Digital Revolution: Medium
    • ENG 455: Film Criticism and Theory: Modern European Film Theory; Contemporary Film Theory; Feminist Film Theory; Classical Film Theory
    • FMS 462, 463, 464: Video and Sound II, III, IV
    • FMS 270: Kinofot: Soviet Cinema and Photography
    • ENG 334: Special Topics: The Myth of the Android; Alien Sex
    • ENG 370: Hollywood and Jewish Values in America
    • Spanish 489 / CLT 416: Women in Hispanic Film; Latin American Film
    • FMS 456: Political Film: Poland and Eastern Europe
    • ENG470: Special Subjects: Words on Film: Novel Adaptations
    • French 484 / CLT 411: Filming / Writing Post-colonial Women
    • FMS 457 / ENG429: Studies in Film: Cyborg Philosophy
    • CLT 414: The City in Film.
  5. Master's Essay / Project.
    The Master's Degree requires a final project, which may take a variety of forms. This will be conducted under the supervision of faculty from George Eastman House and the University of Rochester. All aspects of the Project must be completed by early August in order for students to receive a September degree.
http://selznickschool.eastmanhouse.org/masters_courses.html

University of Hawai'i, Manoa, School



LIS 694: Moving Image Archives (Quirante)An introduction to the basic concepts, principles and technology of moving image archives for professionals tasked with caring for archival audiovisual materials. This course covers methods and strategies for the processing, preservation, and accessibility of archival videotapes and films. Topics include survey of moving image repositories, critical analysis of archival footage, format identification, digitization strategies, equipment and vendor considerations.
http://www.hawaii.edu/lis/courses/course-descriptions/#lis690

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor


Conway
SI 678: Through reading/discussion and lecture, the course examines and evaluates standards for media preservation and reproduction—focusing particularly on digital processes. The course provides a high level overview of specific standards relating to state of the art storage of specialized recording media, as well as care and handling techniques. The heart of the course is an examination of re-recording standards and restoration techniques for sound and motion picture media, with a special emphasis on magnetic to digital re-recording and film restoration. The final segment of the course moves beyond media preservation to consider other preservation challenges, including using preservation metadata schemes, working with vended services, and managing preservation projects. Throughout the course, case studies of specific projects focus on the ethical issues embedded within a variety of technical and aesthetic decisions facing the preservation specialist. In addition the course addresses a range of important preservation issues, such as the identification of the original versus subsequent and multiple versions; the theoretical and practical distinctions between preservation strategies; and the relationship of digital technologies to traditional preservation practices.
https://s3-us-west-1.amazonaws.com/umsi-class/678.pdf

Montréal



ARV 1061: Archives non textuelles.Typologie des archives non-textuelles. Identification des supports et formats. Traitement propre aux archives non-textuelles. Classification. Indexation. Description. Problématique de stockage. Potentiel de diffusion des archives non-textuelles.